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So I’m back! It’s been a quite a long time since I’ve posted. I have been super busy travelling, teaching and learning. It’s been non stop, and to be honest, I’m loving it! So don’t be alarmed (if you are:>), this blog is here for good and I will add to it as often as I am able.

Tonight I want to write a quick one on the topic of realism in Krav Maga. I know this may sound silly in a way, as Krav Maga is meant to be one of the most realistic systems of self defence in the world. Some say it is the most effective and I would would probably agree (though that isn’t my point here), but I have some real issues with some things I see that relate to the marketing, and to the training practices of some schools.

Look around on YouTube and you’ll find a huge amount of videos from a variety of Krav Maga schools and trains of thought. Everyone doing their best to promote Krav Maga and their schools, and most of them genuinely just wanting to help each other. It’s nice to see that Krav Maga has become so popular these days. When I started there were few instructors.

Many of these videos I’m talking of will have you amazed. They demonstrate problems, the solutions and they look super slick. Everything right from start to finish. Perfect! The technique was crystal clear, so perfect, the other person didn’t offer any resistance, they curled up into a ball and didn’t move, and generally the attack that was being defended was pretty average and sometimes just not realistic.

On the other hand you see other types of groups who say they teach Krav Maga but clearly they cannot do choke defences, or bear hug defences, or any of the common things Krav Maga practitioners are taught to do. Instead they grapple and end up looking like they are doing a very poor mma style of street fighting. Krav Maga has a very distinct flavour, the common elements should be there.

It’s sad for me to watch really! At times it seems like Krav Maga is turning into a sport. Or perhaps it’s become more of a style, rather than a system? What do you think? Perhaps some people are basing their skill on how well they demonstrate and how it will look on camera or to the observer rather than how well they can perform the principles, do what needs to be done and improvise and adapt to changes.

Although you can see Krav Maga in someones movements and perhaps judge it, one should base their Krav Maga on their own body type, their personality, their approach to life, perhaps their work, and ultimately what they need Krav Maga for. At the end you will see the Krav Maga in someone, but it’s highly individualised.

No matter what, Krav Maga training must be realistic! If a more serious self-defence training program is not built up to be ‘in your face’ when shit is meant to hit the fan, then perhaps it can’t live up to the reality of the street? One who trains should probably question the real level that they are prepared for. A belt or a patch isn’t always enough to stop a real criminal from doing bad things to you.

While it’s not realistic to turn everyone of us into strong fierce Krav Maga practitioners, warriors and fighters, it is important that we (self-defence instructors) teach solid principles and more importantly the skills to stay out of a fight. ‘On the streets’ is nothing like the promotional and training types of videos previously mentioned. A real attacker may not attack you so obviously, and at such a slow speed. If you’re in the pre-fight stage of conflict then there is a real obvious stress, one that potentially you’re not seeing in the video demonstrations and in certain training centres.

Some may come along and state that the videos do not take into account the whole picture, and perhaps they’re right. But on the bigger scheme of things, if you look around, there is a lot of stuff that lacks realism and shows low levels of skill and understanding of Krav Maga.

There’s a lot of great stuff out there also! In one of my next blogs, I’ll show you. Please comment and share!

 

Written by Kurt Colpan
Your Krav Maga Expert.com
Copyright © 2014
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